Rounds and Scoring

Target Archery Rounds

This page shows the different rounds that are shot in Target Archery, the charts display the round names, distance(s), number of arrows shot (in dozens) and the size of the target face used.

Scoring

Standard target faces are marked with 10 evenly spaced concentric rings, which generally have score values from 1 through 10 assigned to them, except in outdoor Imperial rounds under Archery GB rules, where they have score values 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. In addition, there is an inner 10 ring, sometimes called the X ring. This becomes the 10 ring at indoor compound competitions. Outdoors, it serves as a tiebreaker with the archer scoring the most X's winning. The number of hits may also be taken into account as another tiebreaker. In archery, targets are coloured as follows:

Archers score each end by adding up the scores for their arrows. An arrow just touching a scoring boundary line, known as a Line Breaker or Line Cutter, will be awarded the higher score. Values scored by each arrow are recorded on a score sheet and must be written in descending order (e.g. if an archer scores 5, 7, 6, 10, 9, 8, this must be recorded as 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5). Arrows must not be touched before and during scoring. This is so that if there is disputed arrow score, a judge may be called and the judge will make a ruling on how the arrow lies. The archer in charge of scoring on a target at a tournament is known as the "Target Captain" and in larger tournaments, they may be assisted by a "Target Lieutenant". If there is a dispute regarding scoring it is down to all archers on the target to reach a consensus. If they cannot agree the value of an arrow then the Judge/Field Captain is called and their decision is final.

Under World Archery (WA) rules, in major tournaments, each hole is marked after scoring and before the arrows are drawn. In the event of a "pass through" (the arrow passes straight through the target) or "bouncer" (arrow hits the target and bounces out), points may be awarded to an unmarked hole. Under Archery GB rules, and in some smaller tournaments, in the case of a bouncer, the archer must step off the shooting line and hold their bow in the air. A judge will then make a decision as to whether the archer is permitted to shoot a replacement arrow. If an archer accidentally shoots more arrows than they are allowed, the highest scoring arrow is not counted.

Different rounds and distances use different size target faces. Common sizes (and example rounds they are used in) are:

122cm faces are used in Olympic competition. There are also versions of the 40cm and 60cm targets known as the "3 Spot". The targets contain 3 instances of the inner 5 rings of the 40cm and 60cm faces arranged in a line or an equilateral triangle. This is to stop competitors from damaging their own arrows by shooting a "Robin Hood"

Outdoor Imperial Rounds

These rounds use 5-zone scoring, as opposed to the usual 10-zone scoring. The points are awarded as follows: 9 for a gold, 7 for a red, 5 for a blue, 3 for a black and 1 for a white. Arrows are shot at increasingly closer distances - for example, in a York round, an archer would shoot 6 dozen at 100 yards, then 4 dozen at 80 yards, followed by 2 dozen at 60 yards. Sighters (practice arrows that are not scored) are shot for the furthest distance only.

122cm
ROUND 100y  80y 60y 50y 40y 30y 20y 15y 10y
YORK 6 4 2
HEREFORD 6 4 2
BRISTOL I 6 4 2
BRISTOL II 6 4 2
BRISTOL III 6 4 2
BRISTOL IV 6 4 2
BRISTOL V 6 4 2
St. GEORGE 3 3 3
ALBION 3 3 3
WINDSOR 3 3 3
SHORT WINDSOR 3 3 3
JUNIOR WINDSOR 3 3 3
NEW WESTERN 4 4
LONG WESTERN 4 4
WESTERN 4 4
SHORT WESTERN 4 4
JUNIOR WESTERN 4 4
SHORT JUNIOR WESTERN 4 4
AMERICAN
St. NICHOLAS 4 3
NEW NATIONAL 4 2
LONG NATIONAL 4 2
NATIONAL 4 2
SHORT NATIONAL 4 2
JUNIOR NATIONAL 4 2
SHORT JUNIOR NATIONAL 4 2
NEW WARWICK 2 2
LONG WARWICK 2 2
WARWICK 2 2
SHORT WARWICK 2 2
JUNIOR WARWICK 2 2
SHORT JUNIOR WARWICK 2 2

Outdoor Metric Rounds

These rounds use standard 10-zone scoring. Arrows are shot at increasingly closer distances - for example, in a Gents WA round, an archer would shoot 3 dozen at 90 metres, followed by 3 dozen at 70 metres, then 3 dozen at 50 metres and, finally, 3 dozen at 30 metres. Sighters (practice arrows that are not scored) are shot for the furthest distance only.

  122cm Face 80cm Face
ROUND 90m 70m 60m 50m 40m 30m 20m 15m 50m 40m 30m 20m 15m 10m
WA (Gents) 3 3 3 3
WA (Ladies) 3 3 3 3
METRIC I 3 3 3 3
METRIC II 3 3 3 3
METRIC III 3 3 3 3
METRIC IV 3 3 3 3
METRIC V 3 3 3 3
LONG METRIC (Gents) 3 3
LONG METRIC (Ladies) 3 3
LONG METRIC I 3 3
LONG METRIC II 3 3
LONG METRIC III 3 3
LONG METRIC IV 3 3
LONG METRIC V 3 3
SHORT METRIC 3 3
SHORT METRIC I 3 3
SHORT METRIC II 3 3
SHORT METRIC III 3 3
SHORT METRIC IV 3 3
SHORT METRIC V 3 3
HALF METRIC (Gents)
HALF METRIC (Ladies)
HALF METRIC I
HALF METRIC II
HALF METRIC III
HALF METRIC IV
HALF METRIC V
WA Standard Bow 3 3
WA 900

Indoor Rounds

These rounds use standard 10-zone scoring. To use this table, go down the first column to find the round you want. Then, go across the row; the second column tells you what distance you shoot at (most indoor rounds are shot at only one distance), the third tells you how many arrows you shoot at this distance and the final column shows the size of the target face.

ROUND DISTANCE DOZENS FACE
PORTSMOUTH 20y 5 60cm 
WORCESTER 20y 5 Special
WA 18m 18m 5 40cm 
WA 25m 25m 5 60cm 
WA 25m - COMPOUND 25m 5 40cm
COMBINED WA 25m 5 60cm
18m 5 40cm
COMBINED WA - COMPOUND 25m 5 60cm
18m 5 40cm
DOUBLE WA 25m - COMPOUND 25m 5 40cm
25m 5 40cm
BRAY I 18m 40cm 
BRAY II 25m 60cm 
BRAY II - COMPOUND 25m 40cm 
STAFFORD 30m 6 80cm
VEGAS 18m 5 Special